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Our guide to London: Attractions

Portobello Road

West London’s liveliest street starts off selling quality antiques, and continues through to bric-a-brac indoor galleries, plus food stalls, crafts, clothes and music.

British Museum

Britain’s largest and oldest museum, it is the most visited tourist attraction in London, with over 6 million annual visitors.  The British Museum owns a vast collection of drawings and prints, a small sample of which is always on show in Room 90; it also stages one-off exhibitions – sometimes with free entry.

Lords Cricket Ground

Lord’s, also known as Lord’s Cricket Ground, is a cricket venue in St John’s Wood, London. Named after its founder, Thomas Lord, it is owned by Marylebone Cricket Club and is the home of Middlesex County.

Capacity: 30,000

Christies

Saleroom specialising in fine and decorative art, antiques, jewellery and more, founded in 1766.

Harrords

Put an afternoon aside to visit this landmark most notable for its Art Nouveau tiled food hall.  It also has a huge toy department.  Don’t forget they operate a dress code so no tatty jeans or backpacks.

Big Ben

Of all the attractions in London, Big Ben epitomizes the culture of the capital.

You’ll find Big Ben in Westminster, right in the heart London. The attraction is amongst countless other sightseeing attractions, including Buckingham Palace, 10 Downing Street, the Houses of Parliament and the London Eye, all located within walking distance of one another.

New London Theatre

The New London Theatre is a West End theatre located on the corner of Drury Lane and Parker Street in Covent Garden, in the London Borough of Camden. The Winter Garden Theatre formerly occupied the site until 1965.

Capacity: 1,024

Madame Tussauds

Started by Madame Tussauds in 1802 with the sculpted heads of guillotined aristocrats this attraction has been pulling in the crowds ever since.  To avoid London’s biggest queues, book online: www.madame-tussauds.com

Houses of Parliament

Clearly visible at the south end of Whitehall, the Palace of Westminster (better known as the Houses of Parliament) is one of London’s best-known monuments.  A fine example of Victorian Gothic Revival it is distinguished by the gilded clock tower – popularly known as Big Ben, after the 13 ton main bell that strikes the hour.

St. Paul’s Cathedral

Sir Christopher Wren’s Baroque masterpiece, St. Paul’s is topped by an enormous lead-covered dome that is second in size only to St. Peter’s in Rome.  It is most impressive at night when bathed in sea-green lights.

Westminster Abbey

Since 1066 this royal abbey has been the place where all Britain’s monarchs have been crowned and the interior is cluttered with hundreds of monuments, reliefs and statues.

London Dungeon

The life-sized waxworks inside include a man been hung, drawn and quartered and one being boiled alive – not for the faint-hearted!

Kensington Palace

A Jacobean brick mansion bought by William and Mary in 1689 and the chief royal residence for the next 50 years.  Best known today as the home to Princess Diana until her death in 1997.  Although Diana’s apartments are not open to the public, there is an opportunity to see the Royal Ceremonial Dress Collection and the state apartments.